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August 15, 2008

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Jeff

These look amazing and I can only imagine how good fresh ones taste! After finding your blog the other day, I asked myself what food came to mind when I thought of Hungary. Cherry strudel is what popped up immediately!

I very much enjoyed your fig tree tale as well. Your stories are finely crafted. It's easy to see that you lead a charmed and a charming life.

Proszit!

Jessica

The savory retes you describe make my mouth water. Caramelized cabbage with pepper? Egad. I cannot imagine attempting to make this myself. I'd rather fly to Hungary and buy them from the masters.

Lucy

These do look and sound ambrosial.

I miss savoury pastries here, apart from quiches of course, which one buys at traiteurs, not at bakers or pastry shops.

Once in Greece, we fell in love with some spanokopita sold by the slice in a local bakers, and went back and bought a whole pie, and carried it about all day. It was a little too much, and rather lost something when it was cold and chewy!

Tori

Jeff: Right you are: sour cherry baking is one of the stars of this country.

Lucy: It's the weirdest thing when they go stale. There's a memory there still, and so you want to keep eating them, yet you also start hating yourself after a while. I just threw out the last of them yesterday.

Jessica, caramelised cabbage and lots of black pepper is something that's used in a fair number of dishes here. It is astonishingly unbitter, and sweet, and does take on a caramel colour. One way to roast a duck here is to make sheets of fresh pasta, cut them any which way, toss them with the caramelised cabbage, and stuff the duck which then renders a good ton of fat into the pasta.

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as though second nature. There is a catch as with all things made of laminated dough: their powers are ephemeral. They have a few hours at most, and then they turn distinctly ordinary. So if you get them from a bakery late in the day--or worse, in a restaurant that doesn't care--you'll shake your head wondering how it is people go mad for them.

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